biblio: Psychoanalytical Notebooks, issue 13

Psychoanalytical Notebooks has published many issues with texts of relevance to the themes of semblant and sinthome.  We will review some of those in a series of postings.  The publication is available for purchase on the website of the London Society of the New Lacanian School

In Psychoanalytical Notebooks, Issue 13
This issue of Psychoanalytical Notebooks is a special reference point in the English language for the Congress, as it contains so many references to the sinthome in its discussion of Lacan and his work on Joyce.  I will publish the full contents for the issue below, and I want to highlight just a few of the many texts in this issue.  “Lacan with Joyce” is a Seminar that Jacques-Alain Miller delivered to the Clinical Section of Barcelona in 1996.  Miller carefully elucidates the interest Lacan had in Joyce and its importance for psychoanalysis in that stage in Lacan’s work.  The talk is very good, and there is also valuable interchange between JAM and the audience on these topics.  Philip Draver’s “Joyce and the Sinthome: Aiming at the Fourth Term of the Knot” and Pierre Skriabine’s “Does the Father Say Knot?” are two valuable introduction to the Borromean clinic derived from Lacan’s last teaching.

Lacan With Joyce
Contents:
Psychoanalytical Notebooks 13, 2005
Jacques-Alain Miller – Lacan with Joyce
Pierre Thèves – ‘Où est ton cadeau espèce d’imbécile?’
René Rasmussen – On Joyce and Psychosis
Bogdan Wolf – Joy Joys Joyce… How to Work with the Sinthome?
Marie-Hélène Roch – 21st Century M-A-N
Yasmine Grasser – M-A-N, basic M-A-N, M-A-N oowaza body
Rik Loose – Joyce’s Administration
Philip Dravers – Joyce & the Sinthome: Aiming at the Fourth term of the Knot
Adrian Price – Lacan’s Sinthommage to The Artist: Joyce
Parveen Adams The Sexual Relation in James Joyce and in Cronenberg’s Crash
Pierre Skriabine – Does the Father Say Knot?
Hélène Deltombe -The Child and Lalangue
Vincent Dachy -Scribbledygook: Remarks on Psychoanalysis and Literature
Joseph Attié – ‘This Mad Play of Writing’
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